Categories
Remediation

Over 100 sockeye salmon adults return to spawn in Hazeltine Creek

After seven years of remediation work in Hazeltine Creek in response to the 2014 tailings dam breach, the salmon have returned to the creek to spawn.  In stream work was completed in late August this year, just in time for the sockeye migration in the region.

In the early stages of the Mount Polley remediation effort, 40 thousand truckloads of rock were used to build a foundation channel along Hazeltine Creek from Polley Lake to Quesnel Lake. Next, section by section, the remediation team modified the initial channel and added sinuosity and habitat features to provide instream cover for fish, enhancing the habitat value. These features included spawning platforms, pools, riffles, rock boulder clusters, root wads, and logs.

The biological design for habitat features was developed collaboratively with Mount Polley’s technical experts, Williams Lake First Nation, Xatśūll First Nation, and at the regulatory level, with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.  Collectively the group is referred to as the “Habitat Remediation Working Group.”

Over the past few weeks over 100 sockeye salmon adults have returned to Hazeltine Creek to spawn. “The focus of the Hazeltine Creek remediation effort at Mount Polley has been to repair and rehabilitate Hazeltine Creek so that it becomes a self-sustaining, productive fish habitat.” said Brian Kynoch, President of Imperial Metals. 

Trout have been using portions of the rehabilitated creek to spawn since 2017, and now another major milestone has been achieved with the return of sockeye salmon to the creek. The presence of the sockeye salmon and various other fish species signals that the remedial work has begun to restore ecological function.  This is not only evident in the aquatic environment but also evident across the terrestrial landscape where plant communities are developing, and abundant wildlife is observed.  It is expected that as both the aquatic and the terrestrial ecosystems mature, further ecological function will emerge, and the site will host an even broader array of organisms.

Categories
Remediation

Fish populations thriving at Mount Polley

Habitat modelling reveals four times more juvenile fish are expected in Hazeltine Creek post-remediation efforts

Mount Polley Mining Corporation is pleased to report that fish populations are thriving at Mount Polley.  Further, the current habitat of upper Hazeltine Creek is over 1.5 times more likely to spawn fish than the pre-breach habitat.  A recent report prepared by Golder, Mount Polley’s Environmental Consultant, reveals that the fish population in Hazeltine Creek is increasing as a result of the remediation efforts made by the Mount Polley Habitat Remediation Working Group* since 2014.  Computer modelling of the fish population projects that there could be up to four times more juvenile trout in Hazeltine Creek in 2031 than in 2014.

“By May 2015 the water in Hazeltine Creek was running clear, and the bugs – invertebrates that provide food for fish – were starting to grow in the creek, so it was decided that the installation of new fish habitat could begin and this work started in 2016,” stated Lee Nikl, Principal and Senior Environmental Scientist – Mine Water and Environment Group at Golder.  “By late 2017, fish were let back into the creek.”

We expect there to be almost twice as many juvenile trout in Hazeltine Creek by 2022.  The new report uncovers that this is an outcome of the remediated habitat features in the creek, as well as the unobstructed conditions for upstream passage of fish, which are expected to persist in the long term.  The Habitat Remediation Working Group has been guiding and overseeing habitat remediation since 2014 and “the design objectives and the designs themselves are the outcome of collaborative design with the Habitat Remediation Working Group”, said Nikl.  “The focus of the remediation effort at Mount Polley has been to repair and rehabilitate Hazeltine Creek so that it becomes a self-sustaining, productive fish habitat.” said Brian Kynoch, President of Imperial Metals.

Categories
Research

Imperial Metals congratulates recipients of the 2021 Barlow Medal for Best Geological Paper

Imperial Metals congratulates authors Chris Rees, Greg Gillstrom, and K. Brock Riedell on being the 2021 recipient of the Barlow Medal for Best Geological Paper 

Imperial Metals congratulates authors Chris Rees, Greg Gillstrom, and consultant K. Brock Riedell for being named the 2021 recipient of the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum’s (CIM) Barlow Medal for Best Geological paper award. The CIM Awards honour industry’s “finest for their outstanding contributions in various fields. Their achievements and dedication are what make Canada’s global mineral industry a force to be reckoned with.” 

The Barlow Medal is named after Alfred Ernest Barlow who joined the Geological Survey of Canada in 1883, where he would help to define some of Canada’s most prolific mining regions. The Barlow Medal annually awards a gold medal to those who publish the best paper on economic geology. 

“On behalf of Imperial Metals and Mount Polley Mining Corporation, we congratulate Chris Rees, Greg Gillstrom and K. Brock Ridell for being chosen as the 2021 recipient of the CIM Barlow Medal for Best Geological paper award,” says Brian Kynoch, President of Imperial Metals. “Their work has been instrumental in expanding the mineral potential at Mount Polley.” 

The geological paper is a description of the geology, alteration and mineralization of the Mount Polley deposit, and summarizes exploration and mining history up to the recent mine suspension in May, 2019. Tables of historical copper, gold, and silver production, and reserves and resources are also included. The paper is a contribution to CIM Special Volume 57 (2020) which updates the state of knowledge on major porphyry copper deposits in British Columbia, Yukon, and Alaska. Papers on other Imperial projects, Red Chris and Huckleberry, are also contained in the volume. 

About Imperial 

Imperial is a Vancouver based exploration, mine development and operating company. The Company, through its subsidiaries, owns a 30% interest in the Red Chris mine, and a 100% interest in both the Mount Polley and Huckleberry copper mines in British Columbia. Imperial also holds a 45.3% interest in the Ruddock Creek lead/zinc property. 

Categories
Community Remediation

Mount Polley Remediation Leader Named CIM Distinguished Lecturer

Imperial congratulations to Dr. ‘Lyn Anglin on being named a recipient of the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum’s (CIM) Distinguished Lecturer award.  The CIM Awards honour the mining industry’s “finest for their outstanding contributions in various fields. Their achievements and dedication are what make Canada’s global mineral industry a force to be reckoned with.”

Due to her extensive experience in geoscience research and engagement with the public, Dr. Anglin was hired as Imperial’s Chief Scientific Officer in 2014 to assist with the response to the Mount Polley tailings spill.

During ‘Lyn’s tenure, she provided technical advice to the Company’s spill response team, and liaised with First Nations, local communities, government regulators and industry associations regarding the spill response and progress on remediation.

You can read more about the remediation efforts here and commonly asked questions regarding the Mount Polley tailings spill here.